Summer 2018

Summer 2018 • Talent Economy

Editor’s Note

Lauren Dixon, Senior Editor
ldixon@talenteconomy.io

T

he weeks leading up to the springtime deadlines for this publication were full of notable accomplishments for black Americans. Beyoncé performed at Coachella, making her the first black woman to headline that festival. She and her nearly 100 backup dancers from historically black colleges and universities unofficially renamed the festival — representative of white culture to many — to Beychella. Kendrick Lamar was the first rapper to win a Pulitzer Prize for his double-platinum album, “Damn.” Donald Glover’s Childish Gambino video “This is America” gathered more than 35 million views on YouTube in a matter of two days. Last but certainly not least, Marvel’s superhero success “Black Panther” continued to earn millions, surpassing the Academy Awards’ 1998 Best Picture winner “Titanic” in inflation-adjusted earnings.

People want diversity. What’s taken so long for organizations to notice?

Business leaders must keep up with the times in order to succeed. They should hire the people who are best fit for open roles — race, gender, sexual orientation, age and disability aside. Unfortunately, the motivation to hire a diverse workforce is not only because giving everyone equal opportunity is simply the right thing to do; it’s also because doing so will help earn what business leaders want: money.

By including a diverse group in business decisions, companies can build better products and services to meet the needs of the increasingly diverse population. According to McKinsey & Co.’s “Diversity of thought” report, companies that are highly culturally diverse are 33 percent more likely to have higher average profits than companies with little diversity. Passing those profits on to the workers who help create it will boost not only the company’s profits, but it will also help boost the economy.

America is more diverse today than ever before. Millennials are the most diverse generation yet in America, with 43 percent of 22- to 37-year-olds being nonwhite. The Latino population grew from 9.6 million in 1970 to 57.5 million in 2016. Among babies living with two parents, 5 percent were multiracial or multiethnic in 1980; by 2015, 14 percent were. As these demographics continue to change, the business world should, too.

But why are companies so slow to have staff reflect reality? Only 16 of the Fortune 500 companies released their diversity numbers in 2017, revealing that white men hold 72 percent of these senior leadership roles. In 2017, Google’s workforce was 91 percent white or Asian. Black Americans face twice the unemployment rate of white Americans, leading to an ongoing struggle to gain wealth.

To ignore the experiences of nonwhite workers and not include them in business decisions would be to the detriment of companies. Maybe not today, but into the future.

photo illustrations by Theresa Stoodley

Summer 2018 • Talent Economy

Sponsored By

Forget Charisma, Look for Humility in a Leader

Charisma is an attractive characteristic in leader, but humility is a much better indicator of leadership success

By Dr. Robert Hogan, Founder of Hogan Assessments

T

The existing paradigm in the business world holds that successful CEOs are ambitious, result-oriented, individualistic, and, above all, charismatic. The rise of agency theory, or the notion that incentivizing managers should improve shareholder returns, put greater emphasis on the need to hire leaders that appear leader-like. Unfortunately, conventional wisdom of what a leader looks like is, quite simply, incorrect.

Charisma is a very attractive characteristic in a leader. Yet, when promoted, these individuals create chaos and ruin for their organizations. Humility, rather, is a much better indicator of leadership success. Jim Collins, renowned author of Good to Great, conducted extensive research on organizational success. His work clearly demonstrated that companies led by modest managers consistently outperformed their competitors, and tended to be the dominant players in their sectors. Moreover, humble leaders tend to stay at their organizations longer than their arrogant counterparts, and their companies continue to perform well even after they leave because humble leaders often ensure a succession plan before they depart.

Summer 2018 • Talent Economy

Contents

Summer 2018 • Talent Economy

Thinking About
Diversity
of Thought

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Diversity of thought and opinions in the workplace can lead to great innovation and creative ideas, but it can also lead to conflict. What can companies do to encourage this diversity while also resolving inevitable conflict?

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

by Andie Burjek

P

eople endure different life experiences, think differently and have different opinions on the same topics. These are generally acknowledged truths, but when a sense of division or conflict springs up between individuals or groups of people based off contrasting beliefs, this diversity of thought can pose a problem for both the people entangled in the conflict and those in charge of resolving it.

Diversity of thought has been a player in the diversity space for a while. It’s not to be confused with diversity of thinking, or cognitive diversity, which is the inclusion of people who have different styles of processing knowledge and solving problems. Diversity of thought, rather, focuses on how people’s cultures, backgrounds, experiences and personalities make them think differently or hold different opinions than others.

Businesses want employees who think differently because they increase creativity and innovation, but some see diversity of thought as a cause of concern. Leaders could potentially promote diversity of thought instead of more traditional forms of diversity as an excuse for people to hire or promote someone who looks exactly like them.

What Makes
a Person
‘Diverse’?

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Be careful of euphemisms when talking about diversity.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

BY SUSANA RINDERLE

I

was on the phone with a potential client discussing a possible keynote address I’d give at a corporate conference on women’s leadership. My contact was cordial and enthusiastic, but I wasn’t surprised when she asked me, a bit awkwardly, “Forgive me, I have to ask, but are you diverse?”

As a multilingual, bicultural, racially ambiguous person, it’s not the first time I’ve been asked this question. Sometimes I use it as a teaching moment, but other times I answer the question that’s really being asked. The question is, “Are you a person of color?”

I’ve heard even seasoned professionals in diversity and inclusion use the word “diverse” to refer to people of color as individuals or groups. While I appreciate the polite, conflict-avoidant intentions behind using a euphemism to discuss an uncomfortable topic, this particular euphemism is harmful for two reasons. One, not naming or talking openly about race as such reinforces the awkward, shameful quality of those conversations when such awkwardness and shame are neither necessary nor helpful. As D&I professionals, we should model the openness, confidence and authenticity we so sorely need in the United States when talking about race.

Diversity Is
Learning’s
Business

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

L&D teams have traditionally shied away from diversity and inclusion work. That’s starting to change as companies discover that difference is a source of competitive advantage.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

BY MARYGRACE SCHUMANN

I

n an increasingly polarized world, differences have become an opportunity to sow discord rather than promote dialogue.

This is particularly true in the workplace. In 2017, the #MeToo movement went viral, laying bare the scale of sexual harassment and abuse across the country, especially in the workplace. In today’s world of work, many employees post anonymous comments to employer review sites like Glassdoor or turn to chat forums like Blind to air grievances rather than confront their employers directly.

This mistrust is one of the reasons why diversity and inclusion has taken a new air of importance at work, yet many corporate learning and development functions have traditionally steered clear of the topic, leaving it to HR or a dedicated diversity function. According to Steve Pemberton, chief human resources officer at social recognition provider Globoforce and former chief diversity officer at Walgreens Boots Alliance, organizations tend to treat L&D and D&I as independent functions within HR.

Is D&I Really
About Race
and Gender?

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Diversity leaders should address anything that leads to greater understanding.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

BY R. ROOSEVELT THOMAS JR.

I

and some other diversity practitioners engaged in an informal dialogue about the field and its future evolution. After multiple comments about “it” — the field — consensus emerged that the critical issue was the need to define “it.” Many participants saw race and gender as the heart of the field.

Another practitioner argued that while multiple dimensions of diversity existed, priority focus should be placed on race and gender. In his presentation, he reasoned that if these tough issues were resolved, useful lessons could be gained for application with other dimensions. Both of these perspectives implicitly raise the question, exactly, what is “it?”

How Can Business
Leaders Support
Disabled Workers?

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Disabled workers can be just as productive as able-bodied colleagues. Here’s how business leaders can support and accommodate them.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

By Lauren Dixon

“Tourette [syndrome] started to really impact my work about six years ago,” said Patrick O’Leary, developer relations engineer with tech firm Havok, which is owned by Microsoft in Redmond, Washington. While Tourette syndrome tends to be diagnosed in children and go away by adulthood, O’Leary faced a different challenge. As an adolescent and teen, he could control or suppress his symptoms around people, but stress on the job at Microsoft exacerbated his motor and vocal tics.

“I went from really being able to pass for relatively normal, to some days my body is shaking back and forth severely, making it hard to walk,” O’Leary said. And although it only impacts about 10 percent of people with Tourette’s, he also developed the stereotypical tic of profanity. “That definitely in many ways has caused a lot of unfortunate misunderstandings in and out of work.”

5 Best Practices to
Create an Inclusive
Transgender Culture

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Inclusion is important for all diversity initiatives. Here’s how to include your transgender employees.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

By MIShon Landry

W

hen we’re born, a doctor usually declares that we’re male or female based on what our body looks like. Most people who were labeled male at birth turn out to actually identify as men, and most people who were labeled female at birth grow up to identify as women. But some people’s gender identity — their innate knowledge of who they are — is different from what was initially observed when they were born. Most of these people describe themselves as transgender.

A transgender woman lives as a woman today but was thought to be male when she was born. A transgender man lives as a man today but was thought to be female when he was born. Some transgender people identify as neither male nor female, or as a combination of male and female. There are a variety of terms that these people use to describe their gender identity, like nonbinary or genderqueer.

Missing the
Mark on
Diversity

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Companies must pay attention to their internal policies, benefits and communication practices in order to tackle roadblocks to acquiring and retaining diverse talent.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

BY RITA PYRILLIS

W

hen EY had an opening for a new manager, it was expected that the role would be filled with a candidate similar to those who had held it in the past — white males with auditing experience. But Karyn Twaronite, the firm’s diversity officer, questioned that assumption and suggested a different approach.

“It’s not that anyone said, ‘Hey let’s get a white male from Texas to fill this,’ but it had been a tradition and it was highly successful,” said Twaronite. “I said, ‘Does the role have to be filled by someone with auditing experience, or can we put other technical acumen on the slate?’ That opened up a whole new frontier. The role ended up being filled by a man, but he is a lawyer and Latino. We weren’t searching for the diversity, but by broadening our search we had far more candidates to choose from.”

5 Myths About
Unconscious Bias — and
6 Ways to Reduce It

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

What will you put in motion today to reduce the negative impacts of your unconscious biases?

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

BY SUSANA RINDERLE

T

here’s no denying it, unconscious bias is trendy. It’s so trendy, it’s even become an acronym in some circles, known affectionately as “UB.” But as often occurs when a term or concept becomes common or mainstream, myths and misinformation abound.

Myth 1: We don’t need to worry anymore about conscious bias or bigotry.

We are not post-racial. Individual acts of verbal, physical and emotional violence against people due to their real or perceived group membership are still relatively common. One of my least favorite statistics is that the number of active hate groups in the U.S. increased by 56 percent — to more than 900 — between 2000 and 2014, particularly since President Barack Obama took office in 2008, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.

How to
Achieve
Gender Parity

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

To end pay disparities and equalize employment opportunities for men and women, company leaders must ensure there is an empowering culture and progressive policies in place to give women equal power, opportunity and status.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

BY AVE RIO

“L

ike a lot of women, I don’t think I was woke until Nov. 9, 2016,” said Annie Williams, the team lead for women’s issues at Indivisible Illinois. After the election, Williams joined the Women’s March and was inspired, like so many others, to fight for equality.

Williams said she has encountered implicit bias throughout her life. “I can remember when I would be in meetings and I would say something, and it would be totally shot down,” she said. “And within that same meeting a guy would say the same thing and all of a sudden it was the greatest idea ever. I was in IT, and it was always a struggle for me to prove that I could work as well as the guys. I want my nieces and nephews to grow up in a society where this is not an issue anymore.”

Textio CEO Kieran
Snyder on the
Importance of Language

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The augmented writing app co-founder discusses what language has to do with diversity and inclusion, and what companies can do to improve.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

By Michelle V. Rafter

E

xecutives have talked for years about making their organizations more diverse and inclusive. Despite all the talk, “they mostly haven’t,” said Kieran Snyder, co-founder and CEO of Textio, the augmented-writing software.

Just look at the data. Two-thirds of companies have diversity hiring strategies, and 60 percent of Fortune 500 companies have a chief diversity officer. But the rest of the stats don’t match up to the perceived commitment to diversity; only 3 percent of the Fortune 500 disclose full diversity data and only 20 percent share such basics as employee gender or ethnicity, according to Fortune.

Why
Generations
Matter

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Discover the new relevance of generations, the competitive advantage of generational diversity and three powerful strategies to engage the emerging generations.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

By Ryan Jenkins

F

ifty-two percent of workers say they’re least likely to get along with someone from another generation, according to a recent poll by research and consulting firm, Frank N. Magid Associates. Generations represent one of the top diversity metrics likely to cause the type of workplace friction that leads to poor communication, decreased productivity and leadership miscues.

The friction across generations will intensify as 62 percent of Generation Z (those born after 1998) anticipate challenges working with older generations, according to research conducted by Robert Half and Enactus.

What to Do About an
Employee’s Controversial,
Extreme Political Views

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

When an employer finds that an employee holds controversial or dangerous political views, there are ways to remedy the situation.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

By Lauren Dixon

P

rotesters clashed on and around the campus of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville in August 2017. What started as a gathering by so-called “white nationalists” over the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee turned into a violent and, in one instance, deadly clash as counter-protesters flooded the area as the protest went on.

Following the violence, some of the people photographed carrying swastika-emblazoned flags, making Nazi salutes and chanting anti-Semitic slogans faced backlash from online communities that aimed to expose the participants. Some lost their jobs, bringing to light the question of how employers should handle the employment of workers who may hold extreme, unpopular or controversial political views.

When Diversity
Training Is a Waste of
Time and Money

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Misuse can cost thousands of dollars and waste dozens of hours on diversity training that has little impact.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

By Susana Rinderle

I

may be the only diversity trainer who is often anti-diversity training.

It’s not because I don’t enjoy what I do. It’s not because I’m no good at it.

It’s because half the leaders who contact me for diversity training don’t need it. Thousands of dollars and dozens of hours are wasted every year on diversity training that has little impact — or makes things worse — because leaders make one of the following four mistakes.

The ROI of
Diversity and
Inclusion Efforts

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The return on investment and effectiveness of corporate diversity programs have been debated, but there are many ways in which organizations can correctly gauge this elusive measurement.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

By Andie Burjek

B

eing a good organization for a diverse workforce is the right thing to do, but it’s more than that. It’s also a business function equal to every other business function, according to Edward Hubbard, president and CEO of Hubbard & Hubbard Inc. He is an expert in the field of strategic diversity ROI measurement, has written 45 books and created the Hubbard Diversity ROI methodology, which evaluates a diversity program using seven levels to demonstrate whether or not the program is credible.

Thirty years ago, when he was working on growing the field of diversity analytics, many people argued that diversity didn’t need to be measured because it was just the right thing to do, he said. But the diversity function within an organization needs to present itself with the same legitimacy as any other function — sales, marketing, operations, whatever it is — all of which must present to the CFO reasons rooted in data to support the investments they seek.

From the
Diversity
Experts

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

From inclusion officers to HR experts to consultants, Talent Economy gathered advice from them all. Here’s their advice on successfully leading diverse teams.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

photo illustrations by Theresa Stoodley

How have you seen diversity initiatives change during your time as a diversity leader?

Most of the change I’ve seen in diversity initiatives (and the diversity conversation in general) over the years has been positive. Though, I think there’s been a shift in focus in recent years. Organizations across industries are really waking up to the need to do better when it comes to diversity. It’s something we’ve focused on from day one at Ultimate — respecting, valuing and caring for all individuals — because it’s about doing the right thing. But, now you’re hearing more about the tangible impacts and seeing more and more research showing that diverse workplaces not only have happier employees, but also stronger bottom lines. I think we collectively still have a long way to go, but we’re definitely making progress.

Vivian Maza,
chief people officer at Ultimate Software Group Inc., an HR software company based in Weston, Florida.

Vivian Maza,
chief people officer at Ultimate Software Group Inc., an HR software company based in Weston, Florida.

Most of the change I’ve seen in diversity initiatives (and the diversity conversation in general) over the years has been positive. Though, I think there’s been a shift in focus in recent years. Organizations across industries are really waking up to the need to do better when it comes to diversity. It’s something we’ve focused on from day one at Ultimate — respecting, valuing and caring for all individuals — because it’s about doing the right thing. But, now you’re hearing more about the tangible impacts and seeing more and more research showing that diverse workplaces not only have happier employees, but also stronger bottom lines. I think we collectively still have a long way to go, but we’re definitely making progress.

Summer 2018 • Talent Economy

Contributors

Susana Rinderle

is a principal at Korn Ferry Hay Group, working on diversity and inclusion, as well as talent development. She is a former columnist for Workforce magazine, a sister publication of Talent Economy.

MIShon Landry

MIShon Landry

is a certified diversity professional and owner of Culture Consultants, operating in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. She has more than a decade of experience in project management and supplier diversity.

Monica Klasa

began her career as an advertising creative. Her illustration style has been described as sweet and sour and been featured in several award-winning ad campaigns and editorial publications. She is a Chicago native and a pug enthusiast.

Ryan Jenkins

is an expert on millennials and Generation Z, which he speaks about for keynotes and writes about for publications such as Forbes, Fast Company and Inc. His weekly blog and podcast also inform thousands of people through thought leadership.


Volume 3, Issue 2
Summer 2018

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER John R. Taggart
PRESIDENT Kevin Simpson
VICE PRESIDENT, GROUP PUBLISHER Clifford Capone
VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF Mike Prokopeak
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Rick Bell
EDITORIAL ART DIRECTOR Theresa Stoodley
MANAGING EDITOR Ashley St. John
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR Christopher Magnus
SENIOR EDITOR Lauren Dixon
ASSOCIATE EDITORS Andie Burjek, Ave Rio
VIDEO AND MULTIMEDIA PRODUCER Andrew Kennedy Lewis
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATES Aysha Ashley Househ, Rocio Villaseñor
CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATOR Monica Klasa
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Ryan Jenkins, MiShon Landry, Rita Pyrillis, Michelle V. Rafter, Susana Rinderle, Marygrace Shumann, R. Roosevelt Thomas Jr.
VICE PRESIDENT, RESEARCH & ADVISORY SERVICES Sarah Kimmel
RESEARCH MANAGER Tim Harnett
DATA SCIENTIST Grey Litaker
MARKETING SPECIALIST Kristen Britt
MEDIA & PRODUCTION MANAGER Ashley Flora
PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Nina Howard
VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS Trey Smith
EVENTS CONTENT EDITOR Malaz Elsheikh
WEBCAST MANAGER Alec O’Dell
EVENTS GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tonya Harris
BUSINESS MANAGER Vince Czarnowski
REGIONAL SALES MANAGERS Derek Graham, Robert Stevens, Daniella Weinberg
DIRECTOR, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Kevin Fields
DIRECTOR, AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Cindy Cardinal
DIGITAL & AUDIENCE INSIGHTS MANAGER Lauren Lynch
LIST MANAGER Mike Rovello
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MANAGER Melanie Lee

To submit an article for publication, email editor@talenteconomy.io,
Letters to the editor may also be sent to editor@talenteconomy.io.


Thanks for reading our Summer 2018 Issue!